#CFRalum

Don Gallardo #1805

Don Gallardo‘s latest album, Still Here,

shares his signature sound with fresh vocal phrasing and deep instrumentation.  The lush, beautiful album leans more folk-country or indie folk than the current “take” on Americana music.  Subtle background vocals and harmony complement Gallardo’s voice.  Notable contributors include Erin Rae and Luella.  Gallardo shares raw, honest insight into independent music making.  He reveals the situation that nearly ended the album mid-recording.  While many people gloss over and pretend “everything’s fine,” he clarifies what life is like and how projects derail in a candid conversation.

Country Fried Rock featured Gallardo in our inaugural season

as a radio program.  Sadly, that audio disappeared.  He generously contributed to our charity compilation for musician suicide prevention.  Vol. 1 and 2 continue to raise funds for Nuci’s Space, providing direct services to the music community of Athens, GA.  After a decade in Nashville, Don Gallardo’s connections within the songwriters community led him to collaborate with several friends on Still Here.

Robby Hecht, Mando Saenz, Carey Ott, Doug Williams, David Borne’, Luke Amelang, Jesse Cole, and Tim Easton co-wrote songs for Gallardo’s latest record.

These connections with peers whom Gallardo admires allowed him to learn from their special nuances in both writing and performing, as he elaborates in this conversation in the podcast.  In the studio, Gallardo also included friends and legends, Dylan Alldredge, Joe Andrews (now with Old Crow Medicine Show), Richard Bailey (banjo, played on hundreds of records, including Steeldrivers, Jim Lauderdale, and the Picking On series), Kyle Everson (dobro, who also played on Gallardo’s album Sweetheart Radio Revolution), Hillel Frankel (sax, who also happens to be a noted attorney in Nashville), Jim Hoke (clarinet, played on almost every record you own), Neilsen Hubbard (mixing, percussion, Mary Gauthier, Amy Speace, Garrison Starr, Amelia White), Micah Hulscher (Margo Price), Clint Maine (also in #CFRalumni Allen Thompson‘s band, Brent Mason (guitar on nearly every country hit since George Jones), Bryan Owings (percussion on nearly every Americana hit ever), David Pinkston (nearly every Southern rock record of Sea Level, Cowboy, and Marshall Tucker Band), Dave Roe (Sturgill Simpson, Gretchen Peters, Dwight Yoakam), Andrew Squire (drums in several Nashville bands, including #CFRalumni Andrew Leahey), Travis Stock (of Don’s band), Whit Wright (formerly American Aquarium).

VIDEO PREMIERE: M. Lockwood Porter “Reach the Top”

Written and Produced by M. Lockwood Porter
From the album How To Dream Again on Amazon or iTunes

“Reach The Top”

mlockwoodporter.com
blackmesarecords.com (US)
hiddentrailrecords.bandcamp.com (UK & Europe)

Video by Joseph Casey and M. Lockwood Porter
Featuring Joseph Casey and Kris Payne
Engineered and Mixed by Peter Labberton

M. Lockwood Porter – vocals, guitar, harmonica

Reach The Top

It’s a psychopathic isolation daydream come alive:
The worker drones still serve their queen though she’s destroyed the hive.
Instead there’s bigger houses and some better cars to drive,
A screen to feel connected
A pill to kill the pain,
A ladder to convince you that your climbing’s not in vain,
A mortgage and a mouth to feed that keep you up at night.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “if you play your cards right.”

First, they took the farms, and then they built the factories.
But then they took the factory jobs and they sent them overseas.
They raised all the tuitions and told us all to get degrees.
Now we’re deeper into debt,
Deeper in despair,
Deeper underwater and we’re running out of air.
But if you want to see the rainbow, you must put up with the rain.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say. “There’s no need to complain.”

There’s something percolating in the poorest parts of town.
There’s new cafes and restaurants and new money all around.
And everywhere you go, you hear the same familiar sound.
From Detroit to San Francisco.
From Brooklyn to the South.
In everything that goes into or comes out of your mouth.
In the shirt upon your back or the very bedroom where you sleep.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “but it ain’t coming cheap.”

The suicide is sprawled upon the bloody bathroom floor.
A policeman shot another boy and no one knows what for.
I try to listen to the wind blow, but you can’t hear it anymore.
There’s only smoke and static.
There’s only noise and fear.
There’s only so much talking until you tune out all you hear.
There’s only buried bodies trying to shout up through the dirt.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “but someone’s getting hurt.”

Our new path to heaven’s paved with hundred dollar bills
And a hundred ways to justify the people that we kill.
We have now more than ever, but that won’t satisfy us still.
Every drop of oil.
Every drop of blood.
Everyone who fights back lying facedown in the mud.
Everything belongs to us no matter what the price.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “but you’ll have to sacrifice.”

Lincoln Durham “Creeper”

Country Fried Rock featured Lincoln Durham several years ago, and he’s only gotten better. Here’s “Creeper” off his latest album, Revelations of a Mind Unraveling, available on Amazon and iTunes.

SONG PREMIERE: Kevin Gordon “Shotgun Behind The Door”

Country Fried Rock alumnus, Kevin Gordon‘s, new album Long Gone Time officially lands in stores and online Friday, 4 September 2015, but we are thrilled to exclusively premiere a track off the album: “Shotgun Behind the Door.”

It’s no secret that we love Gordon’s songs, but his live shows are special events, especially when he brings his buddies to play in the band. Grab your tickets for the Nashville album release party ushering in Americana week, Monday, 9/14/15 at the City Winery Nashville. Tickets HERE. Special guest, Sarah Potenza, opens. Keep your eyes on our social media for another special update with Kevin Gordon soon.

Catch the conversation from 2012 here.
Buy Kevin Gordon’s music here.