Dr. Dog

Toy Soldiers #1330

Toy Soldiers hail from Philadelphia.  I first ran across a live series on YouTube that featured them.  From its origins as a side band, light-hearted project, to becoming much more serious and expanding to a dozen players, and then all falling apart on their first long tour — leading to songwriter Ron Gallo returning home as a solo act — Toy Soldiers have evolved and devolved, to completely reinvent themselves and release their first “real” record.  The Maybe Boys, produced by Bill Moriarty, has been under wraps for over a year, so audiences who have caught their vibrant live show will be familiar with the songs, but if you have not had the chance to catch a Toy Soldiers’ show, they have captured their energy and essence in this album.  Get ready to dance and enjoy this radio show!

Liner Notes

  • Toy Soldiers here on Amazon or on iTunes.   The Maybe Boys releases this week, but their past work is fairly varied, as well. Catch their Converse Rubber Tracks EP and more.
  • Patrick Sweany’s new album Close to the Floor and other albums are here on Amazon or HERE on iTunes. Check out our conversation with Patrick Sweany from early 2012 HERE.  This radio show was in our listeners’ top picks of 2012!  If you get a chance to see Sweany live, get there early.  He’s fabulous.
  • Perkasie, originally a buddy band to the earlier version of Toy Soldiers, and later many of their members joined forces with Toy Soldiers. Buy their music here on Amazon or HERE on iTunes
  • Kid Carsons’ music is unavailable on Amazon, but you can get it here on iTunes.  The album cover for The Maybe Boys was photographed on their front porch!
  • Joe Fletcher (and The Wrong Reasons) music is here on Amazon or HERE on iTunes.  Fletcher has a new solo album, too.
  • Dr. Dog here on Amazon or HERE on iTunes — they have a brand new album coming in October 2013 called B Room (but I’ve seen it posted as “BRoom” online, as well).

Podcast

#1246 Holy Ghost Tent Revival

Holy Ghost Tent Revival took their lowest point in the last five years and used it as a reason to find a new sound and revive their music. It’s not any easier to pigeonhole their work than it was before the departure of their bass player and harmony vocalist, but their music is definitely easier to dance to now than it was before. Despite having almost nothing in common with bluegrass music, they are often lumped in there with old time bands–great for a festival lineup, but inaccurate in categorization. Think of the Avett Brothers with a horn section, and you are much closer to the sound of Holy Ghost Tent Revival.

HGTR built their fanbase over their first five years with regular regional dates, playing nearly 200 nights a year and expanded with some key festivals, like Shakori Hills.  Following their band’s membership shuffle, though, they felt like they were starting over.  Defeated and unsure of their future as a band, their confidence expanded when they joined Langhorne Slim for a key set of dates, boosting them enough to commit to recording their latest album, Sweat Like the Old Days, and relocating their groove.

Recording actually gave HGTR new purpose, allowing them to commit to their new sound.  While their presence is still regional, now that they are back on solid footing as a band, they are ready to return to heavy touring and reaching better audiences.  No matter what the venue, though, bring your dancing shoes to a Holy Ghost Tent Revival show.

Please support the bands in this radio program by buying music at the Amazon or iTunes links below:

Country Fried Rock

Podcast