Hank Williams

Chicago Farmer #1307

Chicago Farmer plays Mid-Western folk music celebrating the work ethic and community support of the small towns dotting the flatlands. As the musical persona of Cody Diekhoff, his roots in a tiny town form a strong foundation for the art he continues to create as he has moved back and forth across Illinois, to Chicago and back, repeatedly–moving 12 times in 10 years! “Backenforth” consequently, is the mythical town that holds together the songs in his current record, Backenforth, IL. He was not escaping his small town early on, as much as he was being launched into the wider world with all 25 of the residents behind him.

Relocating inspires Chicago Farmer to write, hence his frequent moving as he developed his songwriting and performing. After a decade as a folk musician playing the upper Mid-West circuit, his new album is the one that he hopes will bring his songs to wider audiences. With lyrics that play well to a barroom singalong, yet have a depth of reflection on the regular life of hard-working people that can easily be overlooked, Chicago Farmer’s music focuses on accessible folk songs.

With influences ranging from Hank Williams to Great American Taxi, Chicago Farmer has logged thousands of miles and hours honing his songs. For Backenforth, IL, he gathered his Hired Hands band, and recorded in affordable sessions, one or two songs at a time, then he would hit the road to earn some money, return and record another song or two, and repeat until the album was finished. For the first decade as a musician, Chicago Farmer was a full DIY solo venture, but he has recently added both management and a booking agent, freeing him up to play and write. One of the biggest advantages to finding management for him, was knowing that someone else with knowledge of the business always “has his back.”

Free song download here.

Liner Notes

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#1249 Mike Cullison

Mike Cullison writes country songs, the kind that pretty boys in rhinestone skinny jeans don’t sing. Cullison’s latest album, The Barstool Monologues, is the most brilliant country concept album in years: auditory theater, imagery via sound, and a premise that pulls it all together. Somewhat like Marty Stuart’s album, The Pilgrim, Cullison calls upon his network of friends to perform his songs (so, the lineup is not Cash, Jones, Harris, and Scruggs, but the idea is similar) and his role as the narrator, in this case, The Bartender, keeps the thread going.

As a songwriter, Cullison crafts his tunes with others’ voices in mind from the beginning, so listening to this album and hearing his own songs sung by others was not odd—it was by design. For listeners unfamiliar with songwriters’ concept albums, one could imagine this as a tribute album in which the writer is the collaborator and even instigator. The Barstool Monologues is a very sensuous collection (if you remember the grocery store grammar lesson in Animal House) appealing to the senses musically, and filling the stories with smoke and scenery. It is as if a short film is running for each song, which is very much intended.

For the CD release show, Cullision created the entire scene of the Roadhouse, with him as narrator and the players rolling in and out. As a premise, this could easily be picked up into a TV series, playing on the success of Nashville, but more purposely focused on the grittier side of music. The idea would play well on stage, too, or even in a genius viral video campaign for the right product. All of this supports the songs, which are exactly what a straight-up country song should be, no pretense.

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  • Mike CullisonMike Cullison
  • Mark Robinson: Produced this album and several of those of The Regulars. He also has a great record of his own, the autobiographical, Quit Your Job, Play Guitar. Quit Your Job - Play Guitar - Mark Robinson
  • Hank Williams: From Cullison’s early music influencesHank Williams
  • Dobie Gray: “Love Is on the Line” was co-written by Don Goodman (Cullison’s early mentor), Waylon Jennings, and Troy SealsDobie Gray
  • Brian Langlinais: One of The RegularsBrian Langlinais
  • Delbert McClinton: Cullison’s music has been described as a cross between McClinton and Hank WilliamsDelbert McClinton
  • John Mellencamp: “Crazy Ones” was co-written with Randy Handley, one of The RegularsJohn Mellencamp
  • Tommy Womack: Daniel Seymour is one of The Regulars, and frequently plays bass with Womack, including on his most recent albumTommy Womack
  • Jon Byrd: One of The RegularsJon Byrd


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