jd wilkes

JD Wilkes #1803

Debut Studio Solo Album from JD Wilkes of Legendary Shack Shakers

JD Wilkes, the vibrant front man of the Legendary Shack Shakers and the Dirt Daubers, releases his debut studio solo album, Fire DreamBruce Watson of Fat Possum Records produced, calling upon his Mississippi hill country cadre of stellar players, including fellow Country Fried Rock alum, Jimbo Mathus (also of Squirrel Nut Zippers), Matt Patton (Drive-By Truckers), and Dr. Sick.  Fire Dream whirls like a sideshow fire dancer, with a circus feel, and a touch of Threepenny OperaYou are not completely sure if this is a beautifully crafted satire or intensely serious.  The songs in Fire Dream find influences from gypsy music and klezmer as much as old time.

Hillbilly gypsy, klezmer, and solo tour with band

Wilkes’ upcoming tour begins as a duo with his long-time bass player.  On several dates, Wilkes opens for musician and performance artists, Unknown Hinson.  By March, the JD Wilkes band tour starts. Members of the Shack Shakers will back Wilkes, but not as a Legendary Shack Shakers tour.  This is a solo album, with a live band that knows how to keep up with Wilkes’ antics.  Additionally, they are playing acoustic and often around a single mic for much of the show — definitely a departure from a LSS show!

Tom Thumb joins the band

Finally, the fifth member of the band joins JD Wilkes — a Tom Thumb piano.  Wilkes bought his Chinoiserie 64 key piano on EBay.  The 100-year old instrument tinkles from the side stage.  These smaller pianos (versus the standard 88 key instrument) often resided in restaurants and speakeasys because they were easier to move around.  Sometimes, traveling salesmen used them as demonstration pieces.  Wilkes discusses their use in Tin Pan Alley songwriting in the last century.

Chad Cochran #1701

I first got to know Chad Cochran, known online as CowtownChad, through the defunct Twitter event, Couch By Couchwest. Cochran’s photographs and mixed media art featuring haunting landscapes and abandoned buildings held titles from songs by musicians featured on our show. Through the magic of social media, we became friends and hung out at AmericanaFest in Nashville one year, and then he came down to South Carolina to cover the Country Fried Rock 4th-ish Anniversary party, where Caleb Caudle played in our rural school house, a magical, slightly decrepit place that is made for singing.

At the urging of Lydia Loveless, Cochran has expanded his photography to include concert shots, with a specialty for stage images and raw portraits. In this podcast, we talk about many of the bands he has “shot” recently (Charles Bradley, Old 97s, John Moreland, etc.) and festivals from Nelsonville to High Water. I also put him on the spot about a “wish project” that I hope he accomplishes, with your help.

Bourbon Country Playlist

Kentucky breeds great music, not just bourbon, basketball and bluegrass. From barn dances to enormous festivals, the state has a thriving and diverse music scene that pairs perfectly with bourbon.

Click here to listen to the playlist.

kybourbonplaylisrtwitter

JD Wilkes & The Dirt Daubers #1338

JD Wilkes & The Dirt Daubers went electric on Wild Moon, and if you only knew their old time acoustic debut, Wake Up Sinners, and have not seen them live recently, you might be as shocked as audiences hearing Dylan go electric at Newport Folk Fest.  Well, maybe not, but that sort of hyperbole is de rigeur for showman, songwriter, harmonica player, illustrator, author, and cartoonist, JD Wilkes.  Frequently using his honorary moniker of “Colonel,” as in Kentucky Colonel, a distinction given by the governor to notable Kentuckians, Wilkes is the creative mind behind the entire sideshow and brand of the Dirt Daubers, including his latest book chronicling small town picking parties and barn dances across Kentucky.  He is as intense a conversationalist as you might imagine, spewing one-liners and ideas like hot popcorn without a lid.  I love his vision and how he ties everything together — like “performance art.”

Liner Notes