Rock

In Memory of Chris Porter: The Mastersons #1706

Friendships run deep when you are a musician. Friends with whom you can pick up right where you left off, after months on the road, become family. Chris Porter forged deep, fast friendships with people in every town he toured, but especially with his tight-knit chosen family of fellow “lifers.” Eleanor Whitmore and Chris Masterson of The Mastersons were family for Porter. The Masterson’s sound permeates his prior album, This Red Mountain. They dropped into the studio one night, just off the plane from tour, to add their sparkle to Don’t Go Baby, It’s Gonna Get Weird Without You. The Masterson’s latest release, Transient Lullaby, was completed but not yet released when he passed away unexpectedly. They dedicated the album to Porter, and often perform the song they co-wrote, “You Got the Last Laugh,” in his memory.

Reed Turchi

Reed Turchi last appeared on Country Fried Rock with his self-titled band, Turchi. His solo release calls in several musician friends, and is even more influenced by his time with Ardent (where he recorded, as well) and Italian bluesman, Adriano Viterbini (who also plays on the album). Speaking in Shadows rocks, but Turchi recently recorded a special pared down version of a song, just for Country Fried Rock listeners. Enjoy “Pass Me Over” below.

Buy Reed Turchi’s album, Speaking in Shadows, on Amazon or iTunes.

Jeffrey Foucault #1603

Jeffrey Foucault’s (pronounced Folk-alt) latest album, Salt As Wolves, brings the #CFRalum (previously featured here) back to his rock and blues roots. The title references Shakespeare’s character, Iago, from Othello, but the songs reflect Foucault’s personal life more than any of his other albums. As he prepares for the European leg of his tour supporting the record, his long-time band slips into his groove without missing a beat.

Buy Jeffrey Foucault’s music here on Amazon.

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Folk Family Revival #1517

Folk Family Revival consists of three brothers and their buddy, but they are definitely moving towards psychedelic rock rather than straight-up folk with their sophomore album, Waterwalker, out now on Rock Ridge Music. With a homemade liquid light show from a visually talented friend, the luxury of regular studio access, and no external time constraints on recording, Folk Family Revival leaps into new territory. The songs continue to grow, both intentionally and for diverse audiences ranging from post-line dance classes in a legendary Texas roadhouse to sportsbars, finding ways to keep audiences engaged and the music fresh.

Buy Folk Family Revival’s music here.

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We welcome your feedback on the show. You can reach me on Facebook or @countryfriedrok.

Hollis Brown #1512

Hollis Brown rocked CMJ & SXSW so hard that they ended up on this summer’s tour with Counting Crows and Citizen Cope. The NYC band, fronted by songwriter, Mike Montali, tours extensively in the US and Europe, building audiences who yearn for their new albums, including their brand new one, 3 Shots, out 5/5/15 on Jullian Records.

Buy Hollis Brown’s music here.

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Please subscribe to Country Fried Rock in iTunes or your favorite podcast app, and leave us a rating and a comment! That will help boost our search results and allow people to find the show more easily.

We welcome your feedback on the show. You can reach me on Facebook or @countryfriedrok.

Patrick Sweany

Country Fried Rock featured Patrick Sweany a couple of albums ago, and the East Nashville-based blues rocker has just gotten better over time. Here’s a quick update from Sweany and another fun new video from him.

Patrick Sweany

1. When I first saw you play live at The Basement during Americana Fest a few years ago, your stage presence and songs blew me away. I think we had a zillion retweets that night! What’s been happening with your touring since we last talked — a couple of albums ago?

Well, a lot of things. It seems as though most of the momentum we have been experiencing has been readily apparent in the last 12 months. Doing some opening slots in the US for Tedeschi Trucks Band (nicest people in the biz, everyone in that band is a cool human being) and a lot of the attention that my song “Them Shoes” has received via Internet radio has exposed a larger amount of people who are now interested in seeing us live. It’s nice to see an audience excited to see the show, rather than us having to win them over from zero. Which means we have to be better when we come around. I’ve added a member to the band, Zach Setchfield, on guitar to play the new material and it really augments the live show. Having a really consistent touring line up in Dillon Napier on drums and Jason Harris on bass. Really driven, focused musicians and really cool guys, so the van hang has been great too. Most recently we just completed four weeks overseas and a bunch of dates in the mid south and mid west, prior to the European dates.

2. I didn’t realize how funny you are, too, until I saw the “Working For You” video. How did that idea roll around with your latest album?

I’ve always adhered to the David Lee Roth school of musical cinema. The album is pretty heavy, subject matter wise, and trying to do something dark for my first video seemed a bit much. I’ve always admired funny people. The original idea was to be an Al Bundy-esque shoe salesman and showcase some awkward and ridiculous social interactions, but we lost the location I had in mind. Door to door vacuum cleaner salesman seemed to have a suitable amount of interaction to carry the desired amount of random social awkwardness. While talking to my neighbor and fellow East Nashville BB Gun Club ( #ENBBGC ) co-founder Terry Rickards, he hipped me to his experiences as a Kirby salesman. That was definitely some food for thought. We worked with Dave Shamban, Marty Linville and Craig Hill, whose work on The Altered Statesman’s “Bait” I really admired. I couldn’t be more pleased how it turned out.

3. Where are you headed on tour? Any new places or venues? Old favorites? Anybody coming along or are you joining up with anyone else (openers, etc.)?

The current run is full of both new territory and some familiar stomping grounds, and nearly all of it headlining dates, and all of it the first time with the new band . The Canadian dates, including Montreal Jazz Fest are a big jump for us, playing NYC is always a thrill as well. Really great audiences for us there.

We also hit the old stomping grounds in Ohio for several dates across the state, which is always awesome. Just really amazing to play to hometown crowd when you’ve been away, that’s always the best.

Check out another fun video here.

Buy Patrick Sweany’s music here on iTunes and here on Amazon mp3 and physical music..

Hymn For Her: Lucy Fur Video

The brand new video from the wacky humor of Hymn For Her!

Buy their excellent new rocking record, Lucy & Wayne’s Smokin’ Flames HERE on Amazon or HERE on iTunes.

Check out our feature with them this year right HERE.

Get the free podcast HERE.

Rich Mahan #1304

Rich Mahan blames Bobby Bare for his slightly naughty, humorous songs, but really, he just wants you to have fun and enjoy the music.  Mahan’s debut solo record, Blame Bobby Bare, creates an auditory party–even if it’s just a quick escape from your workday and stresses of life by cranking up the music.  Go ahead and dance around the office if you want.

Mahan’s own musical journey began with a middle school talent show, leading him to play guitar with bands ranging from jamband to Texas rock, and find a way to be in the music field in some way at all times.  The deconstruction of smaller imprints of major labels sent him from Los Angeles to Nashville, where Mahan found other creative communities forging their own DIY path apart from the current music mold.

This independent trajectory, and intense pool of exemplary players and persons in the music industry, made Mahan’s album possible.  From the analog recording and mixing choices, to the top-notch musicians who joined the project, Blame Bobby Bare represents not just where Mahan is now, but how his history has led him to this day–fun, slightly inappropriate, but something most people can relate to and enjoy–even if your mother never found…you know…in your room!

Liner Notes

  • Rich Mahan Blame Bobby Bare [Explicit]  From his days of contributing songs to Dr. Demento to now, Mahan’s songs are fun, embracing some of life’s bad decisions with gusto.  Please note that there are drug references in many of these songs.
  • Shurman Still Waiting For The Sunset  A record from the Country Fried Rock alums, now out of Texas.  When they were all in Los Angeles, Rich Mahan was part of the band and contributed to several songs even when he was no longer in the band.
  • Rainbow The Best Of Rainbow  Great big rock and roll.
  • Bobby Bare Bobby Bare Sings Lullabys, Legends And Lies (And More) “Dropkick Me Jesus” This was a tough decision, as I really wanted to select one of the songs written by Shel Silverstein, “Qualudes Again,” but there wasn’t enough time.
  • The Standells The Very Best Of The Standells “Dirty Water” I chose the original album version instead of the spruced up version you occasionally hear on classic rock radio.
  • The Who Quadrophenia [Explicit]  “The Real Me” The most serious song in this week’s radio show, but the emotion contrasts nicely with all the silly, fun, party music of the rest of the show.
  • Boo Ray Bad News Travels Fast  This is a record from a Country Fried Rock alum, one that really should be part of a roots music collection.

NOTE:  There are references to drug use in the 1960’s and 1970’s  in this conversation and some of these songs, specifically, a bit about Jimi Hendrix using drugs before the Monterey Pop Festival and by the musicians in The Last Waltz.  Some of the song lyrics also reference drugs, as evidenced by their titles.

Podcast

#1251 Bloodkin

Bloodkin’s 25th anniversary box set, One Long Hustle, is everything a retrospective should be, yet it is completely new, too. The booklet of the band’s history reminisced and revealed by Daniel Hutchens, the collection of previously unreleased tracks, and the stories they tell are as much about Athens, Georgia’s musical spiderweb as they are of the band itself. Despite collaboration with legends like Moe Tucker and Sterling Morrison of the Velvet Underground and Southern stalwarts like Gov’t Mule, Bloodkin might be the band that was always there for every amazing show– that you have never heard of before…but you have probably heard their music.

Friends and conspirators with the guys in Widespread Panic from the beginning, many of Hutchens’ and Eric Carter’s songs gained notoriety when played by the jam band, like “Can’t Get High,” “True to My Nature,” and “Henry Parsons Died.”  One Long Hustle is like being transported to the nights you might have missed at their famed High Hat residency “way back when.”  Bloodkin’s songs sound like them, but definitely do not sound the same.  They travel through their different sounds in a natural flow, bringing their own history, the sounds of their friends who play on various tracks, and their latest muse with them.

What appeals most about One Long Hustle is the breadth of the recordings:  living room tapes on a 4-track Tascam, cleaned up in the studio by David Barbe, but wisely not sanitized into a shiny version apart from the original, studio outtakes from a variety of formal and informal sessions throughout the Southeast,and alternate takes that did not make an album playlist for one reason or another.  Bloodkin’s 25th anniversary is not just about history; it’s also about where they are headed.  They recorded a few new tunes for the release, too.  Listening to all 88 songs carries me through the 25 years of Georgia music that formed me, too, from the Athens, Georgia Inside Out days (which was around or just before when Hutchens and Carter arrived from West Virginia) to the current success of The Whigs or Drive-By Truckers.

Author’s Note:  Bloodkin generously donated “Henry Parsons Died” for a worldwide debut for Country Fried Rock’s Compilation Vol. 1 to Benefit Nuci’s Space in Athens, GA, available for free download here.  Please consider a generous donation to Nuci’s Space in return for the download.  They prevent musician suicide by removing barriers to mental health care and a lot more. 100% of the money in the compilation’s “tip jar” goes directly to Nuci’s. I personally covered all the expenses of the album. SS

Liner Notes

  • Bloodkin You should buy the One Long Hustle box set from the band just for the amazing liner notes.  The music is, of course, worth every penny.  Bloodkin
  • Widespread Panic Hugely supportive of Bloodkin’s music, recording and playing several tunes from Hutchens and Carter over the last 25 years. Widespread Panic
  • Vic Chesnutt Athens’ songwriter (anti-)hero, who passed away a few years ago. At least 2 documentaries  about him are floating around. Vic Chesnutt
  • The Rolling Stones Some Girls (Deluxe Version)Some Girls (Deluxe Edition) - The Rolling Stones
  • Bob Dylan Street-LegalStreet-Legal - Bob Dylan
  • Brute (Originally, a collaboration between Vic Chesnutt and some of the members of Widespread Panic.  On the second album, I believe the whole band joined Chesnutt.  WP still plays “Blight,” and other Chesnutt songs, like “Aunt Avis,” regularly.)  Nine High A PalletNine High a Pallet - Brute
  • Sugar: Copper Blue (Deluxe Remaster) Engineer and producer to the stars, songwriter, singer, player, leader of the Quick Hooks, David Barbe also played bass in Sugar.  Bob Mould (formerly of Husker Du) still plays these songs regularly. Sugar
  • The Heap: Deluxe The Heap horns. So fabulous that they are going to be the bed music for the 2013 Country Fried Rock radio shows.Deluxe - The HEAP
  • Betsy Franck Franck was featured in 2011 on Country Fried Rock. She is a fixture of Athens’ current music scene, singing on hundreds of bands’ albums, in addition to her own music. This Far - Betsy Franck
  • Taxi Driver (Two-Disc Collector’s Edition), the Robert de Niro movie, from which the character Travis Bickle’s line forms the title for this box set. Taxi Driver

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