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VIDEO PREMIERE: M. Lockwood Porter “Reach the Top”

Written and Produced by M. Lockwood Porter
From the album How To Dream Again on Amazon or iTunes

“Reach The Top”

mlockwoodporter.com
blackmesarecords.com (US)
hiddentrailrecords.bandcamp.com (UK & Europe)

Video by Joseph Casey and M. Lockwood Porter
Featuring Joseph Casey and Kris Payne
Engineered and Mixed by Peter Labberton

M. Lockwood Porter – vocals, guitar, harmonica

Reach The Top

It’s a psychopathic isolation daydream come alive:
The worker drones still serve their queen though she’s destroyed the hive.
Instead there’s bigger houses and some better cars to drive,
A screen to feel connected
A pill to kill the pain,
A ladder to convince you that your climbing’s not in vain,
A mortgage and a mouth to feed that keep you up at night.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “if you play your cards right.”

First, they took the farms, and then they built the factories.
But then they took the factory jobs and they sent them overseas.
They raised all the tuitions and told us all to get degrees.
Now we’re deeper into debt,
Deeper in despair,
Deeper underwater and we’re running out of air.
But if you want to see the rainbow, you must put up with the rain.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say. “There’s no need to complain.”

There’s something percolating in the poorest parts of town.
There’s new cafes and restaurants and new money all around.
And everywhere you go, you hear the same familiar sound.
From Detroit to San Francisco.
From Brooklyn to the South.
In everything that goes into or comes out of your mouth.
In the shirt upon your back or the very bedroom where you sleep.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “but it ain’t coming cheap.”

The suicide is sprawled upon the bloody bathroom floor.
A policeman shot another boy and no one knows what for.
I try to listen to the wind blow, but you can’t hear it anymore.
There’s only smoke and static.
There’s only noise and fear.
There’s only so much talking until you tune out all you hear.
There’s only buried bodies trying to shout up through the dirt.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “but someone’s getting hurt.”

Our new path to heaven’s paved with hundred dollar bills
And a hundred ways to justify the people that we kill.
We have now more than ever, but that won’t satisfy us still.
Every drop of oil.
Every drop of blood.
Everyone who fights back lying facedown in the mud.
Everything belongs to us no matter what the price.
“You may reach the top one day,” they say, “but you’ll have to sacrifice.”

Lee Gallagher #1507

Lee Gallagher inhales the Bay area of California, making it part of who he is musically. After a few years in the area, Gallagher appreciates its history and vibe even more than when he was a Midwestern kid seeking something other than cornfields. He is not jaded about his roots, though, rather, he takes the indie roots rock foundation and filters it through his newer psychedelic surroundings. With two recent albums that deserve a listen, Lee Gallagher shares his appreciation for his new home region and musicians.

Buy Lee Gallagher’s music here.

Podcast
Download here, links below, or on SoundCloud.

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Jacob Furr #1424

Jacob Furr has been on our radar for a couple years, due to the surprisingly small world of Texas songwriters and Country Fried Rock alumni. Larry Hooper played Couch By Couch West and mentioned Furr, and then through our recent alumni, St. Paul & The Broken Bones, we were also connected via conversations about coffee. How does all of this relate to Furr’s new album, Trails & Traces? As Jacob profoundly says in our conversation, “We don’t live in a vacuum. None of us are doing this alone.”

Listen to this emotional conversation about songwriting and the memory of his young wife, Christina, who passed away after a terrible illness. Somehow, this is a hopeful, joy-filled chat about a person I only knew through my love of coffee and her blog, Cup Of Texas, and the melancholy songwriter who loved her. #CupOfMornings

The free PODCAST is at the bottom of this page.
It’s much longer than most, so give it time to download.
The radio program, heard on select radio stations, features a shorter version of this conversation.

Support Jacob Furr HERE on Amazon or Jacob Furr on iTunes by buying his music.

Video
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Podcast

Tea Leaf Green #1325

Tea Leaf Green considered renaming themselves after their original membership changed, when their bass player and founding member, Ben Chambers, abruptly left the band. Six years and two albums after that realignment, Tea Leaf Green have redefined themselves, continuing to create their own sound honoring the song and lightening their sound. In The Wake is not sparse, by any stretch, but rather than full instrumentation every moment for each song, their is a more careful addition of sounds, guided by producer, Jeremy Black. In The Wake includes more additional sounds than just the members of the band, yielding a lush, clearly “studio” album, rather than a “live,” jamming vibe.  Shaking up their previous recording methods forged an entirely different process and product with this album; it was the first time they recorded separately in the studio and did not road-test songs prior to recording. Their CD release party was the first time they played all of the songs live–giving a new kind of energy to this noted, vibrant (jam) band.

Liner Notes

  • Tea Leaf Green In The Wake
  • Animal Liberation Orchestra (ALO) — Sounds Like This [+digital booklet]  Their friends from the San Francisco scene.
  • Lissy Trullie  Producer Jeremy Black played drums on much of this album.
  • Jacob Fred Jazz Oddyssey Walking With Giants  Reed Mathis’s previous band.
  • Rebirth Brass Band Do Whatcha Wanna  have a residency at the Maple Leaf Bar in New Orleans right now.
  • Whitey Morgan Sucking the 70’s: Back in the Saddle Again. You probably need Volume 1, too: Sucking the 70’s — not to be confused with the Stones album of nearly the same name, Sucking in the Seventies  This is a “loose association” connection; I discovered that Josh Clark worked on a song for this compilation and sang on a track, but my Google fu was not adequate to determine which track, so I chose one that most clearly shows the intent of this compilation–take songs from the 70s and make them your own, which Whitey Morgan clearly did on this one.

Video